Contraception

Nov 14

IUDs: The Other Side of the Speculum

I’m a single, white, sexually-active young woman with no significant medical history and I want an intrauterine device (IUD).  Yet after four months of trying to get an IUD, I still have an empty uterus.  At the end of my last visit to the doctor, I turned to my friend exasperated and exclaimed, “Why does…

Oct 10

Language in the Exam Room

The medical students and residents we train are often surprised at the emphasis we put on language in the exam room. Take this recent story from a family doctor in our practice who was working with a medical student: While examining the patient she [the medical student] used phrases like, “Scoot your bottom down until…

Aug 08

That’s a RHAP!

This summer and my internship with the Reproductive Health Access Project have come to a close.  At our final staff luncheon on July 25, 2012 my fellow interns and I were asked to comment on the most surprising thing we learned as part of our experience with the non-profit organization.  Given the current political climate,…

Jul 18

Staff Summer Book Picks

Our staff loves to read – especially books about reproductive health and access issues!  So this summer we thought we’d share a few of our favorites so you could add them to your summer reading list. And if you have any recommendations, send them our way. Happy reading! p.s. If you buy any of these…

Jul 11

Meet Our Summer Interns!

We are thrilled to introduce you to our two summer interns – Lianne and Mia! These wonderful new members of the Reproductive Health Access Project team will be with us all summer long, putting together workshops and trainings, doing research on policy issues, and writing for the blog. Here’s a little info about them. Name:…

Jun 27

I Know Why the Caged Birds RHAP

“If she were a normal patient…” Physicians use the words “normal” and “abnormal” to differentiate lab values and physical exam findings. But on this evening in particular, in our student-run free clinic in Pennsylvania, our patient had no apparent anomalies.  When the physician implied she was abnormal, he wasn’t referring to her health. He was…

Jun 20

Patient-Centered = Pro-Choice

Family physicians aim to be “patient-centered.”  It’s not always clear, however, what that means.  It doesn’t mean that we give antibiotics to anyone with a cold who wants them.  It doesn’t mean we prescribe narcotics for anyone who requests them.  We practice medicine responsibly while paying attention to  our patients’ concerns.  Being patient-centered is more…